Morning readings

I have been away from this blog for quite a long time, busy in a lot of other things. I will start again today with a first attempt for a diary.

In the morning, before starting the real work, I usually go social and read around from feeds, tweets etc. I always wanted to write some sort of summary, just to keep memory of what I see. Today I decided to do it, perhaps inspired by this post on personal memories preservation.

There is a full guide on personal archiving at the Library of Congress, full of links and pieces of advice.

Two interesting post are dealing with book history and the potential of multispectral images to help recovering data in damaged manuscripts, a technique used by Alejandro Giacometti, a PhD student in Digital Humanities at King’s College London.

For the more technically inclined, W3C, the consortium behind Internet, published the highlights for November 2013, a “survey of select recent work and upcoming priorities“, that can give you an idea of where the Internet is going.  Particularly interesting for digital humanists, and academics in general, is the discussion of “how Open Web Platform is transforming digital publishing”, among other things (such as automotive, television, entertainment). Perhaps a full-blown post is lurking there somewhere, waiting to be written.

Speaking of which, Melissa Terras published what I might call an “educated rant” against the publishing industry unreasonable fees for open access publishing.

An upcoming, open workshop on Linking Spatial Data (London, sometimes in March), could be of interest to spatial humanists.

The Zen part of me likes posts on how to unclutter my life (not that I succeed to do it, but I will keep trying…)

Henry Jenkins published the third part of Participatory Poland. I always read his posts.

Not very sure what to make of this.

Two things are planned today in the outside world, as you can see from the calendar on the right:

Open Source Developers Conference (OSDC) 2013 in Auckland, NZ : #osdc2013

Sustainable history: ensuring today’s digital history survives (Institute of Historical Research, UCL)

I will try to follow tweets from both. Keep you posted (maybe).

Finally, you might be interested in some thoughts on The myth of virtual currency. Creative financing has done enough damage in the recent past, maybe we should avoid the same faith with virtual currency?

But I should of course end with something more positive, so I will add a guide to happiness, which seems to me the best possible conclusion.

It looks like it took too long. I will have to improve the process next time. Probably I should call it daily readings and add stuff during the whole day, whenever I read something interesting. It could become something like a day of digital humanist’s for the whole year. We will see.

Posted in Diario